Monthly Archives: April 2016

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Monogrammed Jewelry Etiquette

Monogrammed jewelry comes with a very personal and traditional detail, but is it true that there’s etiquette involved? Certainly! But what basis does this etiquette have?

Plenty of things are involved in monogramming etiquette, including letter sizes, correct sequence of initials, whether or not the couple is heterosexual, and all the others. Confused by the possibilities? They’re not really that difficult, but you do need know more about monogramming.

Monogramming is actually the world’s earliest form of identification, going back well into the times of the Greeks and Romans. It has served a lot of purposes, from being a type of currency in the barter system to being a signature for royals and artists, and more. Perhaps the most obvious role of monograms today is to identify properties, from handkerchiefs to yes, jewelry. Of course, we know that they are usually decorative, and that’s why monogramming is very popular in gift-giving.

Single-letter Monograms

Conventionally, one-letter monograms represent the last name. That holds for both men and single women. Today, most single-letter monograms for unmarried women feature the first letter of their first name.

Three-letter Monograms

Modern monograms are usually come in traditional Victorian forms, meaning they contain three letters. The arrangement of these letters depend on two factors – marital status and the sizes of the letters in the monogram.

One-size Letters

If a monogram contains letters of the same size, the those letters should be the first of the monogram owner’s first, middle and last name, in that specific order. Also, this setup is for unmarried men and unmarried women.

Big Surname Letter at the Center

Single men and women must use the first letters of their first, last and middle names in that particular sequence. And the surname should always be the centered and biggest font.

There are two concepts in terms of married couples. One, in the “ladies first” tradition, is that the bride’s first initial has to be on the left of the surname initial, while the groom’s first initial is placed on the right. Historically, this style is commonly used in linens.

A more modern setup is the groom’s first initial coming before the bride’s, to follow the tradition of Mr. & Mrs. Although used on tableware and glasses before, this is now commonly used on jewelry. For married women, the woman traditionally uses the initial of her maiden name as her middle initial in a three-letter monogram. Or she can use the initials of her first name, married name and middle name. Finally, for gay couples, the initials of both their names will be taken together and used as the surname.

Source: http://www.elledeesbeauty.com/2016/04/5-easy-steps-to-change-your-look.html#.Vwy88RMrJ25